Haydarpasa Station in Turkey

Haydarpasa Station is now the busiest train station in Turkey. Designed by 2 German architects, the existing station was completed in 1909 built on land reclaimed from the sea.

Asian side of Istanbul

The Asian side of Istanbul, as it's known to locals, has few sites of interest to Western tourists so you can really experience Istanbul life unaffected by the tourist scene.

Üsküdar

Relatively unknown to tourists, the suburb of Üsküdar, on the Asian side of the Istanbul strait, is one of the most attractive suburbs. Religiously conservative in its background, it has a tranquil atmosphere and some fine examples of imperial and domestic architecture. turkey travel istanbul strait

The iskele, or Mihrimah Mosgue is opposite the main ferry pier, on a high platform with a big covered porch in front, often occupied by older local men watching life around them. Opposite this is Yeni Valide Mosgue, built in 1710, and the Valide Sultan’s green tomb rather like a giant birdcage. The Çinili Mosque takes its name from the beautiful tiles which decorate the interior, and was built in 1640.

Apart from places of religious interest, Üsküdar is also well known as a shopping area, with old market streets selling traditional local products, and a good fleamarket with second hand furniture. There are plenty of good restaurants and cafes with a great views of the Istanbul strait and the rest of the city, along the quayside. In the direction of Haydarpaşa is the Karaca Ahmet Cemetery, which is the largest Muslim graveyard in Istanbul. The front of the Çamlıca hills lie at the ridge of area and also offer great panoramic views of the islands and river.

Haydarpaşa

5.5 kms to the south of Üsküdar is Haydarpasa, and the train station built in 1908 with Prussian-style architecture which was the first stop along the Baghdad railway. Now it is the main station going to eastbound destinations both within Turkey, and international. There are tombs and monuments dedicated to the English and French soldiers who lost their lives during the Crimean War (1854-56), near the military hospital. The north-west wing of the 19th Century Selimiye Barracks once housed the hospital, used by Florence Nightingale to care for soldiers, and remains to honour her memory.